Games with Stories.


I have really started getting into storytelling games, while letting the typical D20 games take the back seat. I feel I am getting more out of them. Don’t get me wrong, I still enjoy Dungeon and Dragons and games like that, but they seem to get more into the hack and slash and less away from the story.

The first game I played was Do: Pilgrims of the Flying Temple. I played this with a few friends, using a wiki to post our “moves”. For those not familiar with Do: Pilgrims of the Flying Temple, you play Pilgrims sent to help out in a situation. Different situations can be found on line. Each player gets to write one sentence to help the situation or to hurt the situation depending on the stones they pull from a bag. There is more to it, then how I am making it sound. My point is I enjoyed it; I got to be a silly pilgrim, who managed to stay in trouble. We enjoyed so much, we are going to be playing again in May. If you are interested this game, you can find more information here. To see our story you can check it out here.

The next Game was Danger Patrol. This game was a blast to play. The whole thing took less the 15 minutes to set-up. It is a silly game, which is based off the old sci-fi serials of the 40s and 50s. I played the ghost of Evil Kenevil . I told you it was silly. With this game you make it up as you go. Unlike DO, Danger Patrol does use dice. The more danger you put yourself in, the more dice you get to use. You put yourself in danger by making up the story. However if you roll poorly, the GM will put you in more danger, therefore prolonging the story. You can find Danger Patrol here.

The last one, and probably my favorite so far is Dread. Dread also does not use dice, it uses Jenga. Every ones favorite block pulling game. This game is meant to be played in as a horror game. The first game time I was part of a game of Dread, the store was based around Sphere (by Michael Crichton). Some of us survived that game. The second game, which I ran, was based off Phantoms by Dean Koontz. Everyone died in this game. The great thing about dread is that with Jenga being the deciding element, it really adds that tension. Especially when you know the tower is about to fall and there is no escape. You can find more information for Dread here.

One of the pulls from the Dread game. The players were in a library when all of a sudden the selves of books started to fall. They pulled a plank to dodge books.

The one thing I really love about all three of these games is the fact you can pretty much play them with little to no investment. This is completely different then D&D and some other roleplaying games out there, which nickel and dime you to death.

So if you have some free time, give some of these games a try. I would also love to hear some of the other great, cheap (if not free) storytelling games that are out there.

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Do: Pilgrims of the Flying Temple



I just recently finished my first game of Do: Pilgrims of the Flying Temple. It was a play by post game, and was quite enjoyable. For those with you unfamiliar with Do: Pilgrims of the Flying Temple, it is a story creation game. You play a monk type person who tries to help people in trouble. The game starts off with the pilgrims receiving a letter about some trouble that is rising, and it is your job to stop that trouble. There are rules that dictate on rater you succeed or not.
You can find more information about it –> here <–
So here is the letter I and the other payers received.

The Letter

I’m probably not who should be writing you about

this problem, but my boss George has locked himself in

the executive bathroom and won’t come out. Not that I

blame him, except, you know? I do. Still, I can understand.

Things were pretty simple here at Popsicore Park. We

sold tickets and junk food, kept the rides running and

the park clean (a big job that, what with the rides, kids

and junk food). It was hard work, yeah, but not exactly

mentally taxing.

When the Sky Cabbages first came to our world it

didn’t make much of an impact here. It was pretty weird

that our world was being visited by talking Sky Cabbages,

but it didn’t have anything to do with the daily round of

repairs, cleanup and crowds. Not even when a bunch of

crazies called “The Coleslaw Front” started attacking the

Sky Cabbages at random with bombs and machetes. But

then the Cabbages discovered that they loved amusement

parks. So of course they showed up here.

That gave us a number of problems. First, since

they were six-foot high, the Cabbages are tall enough

for our rides. But they’re also six-feet wide, which is a

bit of an issue. We could have turned them away, but

the Sky Cabbages waved a lot of money at George, so he

signed some contract with them and told me to figure

something out.

Most of our rides are based on a standard cart design.

I figured that if we replaced all the seats with a padded

floor and sides and added extra safety straps, we could

accommodate one Sky Cabbage per cart. I told George

this, and he told me to change over a quarter of the carts

on each ride to carry Cabbages.

Well, we closed three days in midweek for the

changeover, and planned to reopen on Friday with a big

ad campaign about how we were now “Cabbage friendly

George figured since a lot of people were curious about

the Sky Cabbages, we’d pull in a lot of regular people, to

He’d probably have been right, if the High Slicer of the

Coleslaw Front hadn’t gotten on the radio and broadcast

a threat to send a thousand thugs with machetes to slice

up the Cabbages if they dared show their, ah, leaves, at

our park.

Well, just as George had decided to not open the park

on Friday, a delegation of Cabbages showed up, waving

the contract George had signed and told him in no

uncertain terms that they weren’t afraid of the Coleslaw

Front, and if the park wasn’t open Friday, they’d sue.

That’s when George retreated, leaving me in charge

This leaves me with two big questions I was hoping

you guys could help me with: first, do I open the park

tomorrow; and second, even with the modified cart, is

safe to put a giant Cabbage on a roller coaster?

I’ll stick this letter in a helium balloon and let it go —

with any luck it’ll float to your temple in time.

Best,

Hazel Harrington

Chief of Maintenance, Popsicore Park

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
And here is the story of how we tried (and failed) the save the day

Loud-mouth Little-gift descends on Popsicore Park, raining free park passes on all the citizens as he flies by. Pilgrim Confused Stone thinks a typo has occurred, and starts adding “ing” behind the word “park” on all the free PARKING passes he can find. Impulsive Haiku approaches The Coleslaw Front and presents them with a beautiful poem about peace. Pilgrim Confused Stone offers to open any jars, for his strength matches that of a thousand thugs. Hazel Harrington asks Pilgrim Confused Stone to look at the contract her boss signed. It’s a good thing Loud-mouth Little-gift knows a thing or two about marketing, for those who volunteer to pay for parking also get a Popsicore Person bobble-head! Misunderstanding little Pilgrim Loud-Mouth Little-gift request to make one-hundred six inch Popsicore Person bobble-heads, Pilgrim Confused Stone proceeds to make one-hundred six-foot tall Popsicore Person bobble-heads.

George returns and is furious with Confused Stone about the bobblehead mixup, but Pilgrim Impulsive Haiku calms him, saying- ‘Chance may slip away. Unless it is gazed upon. By those with fresh eyes.’ She then glomps George, who doesn’t take too kindly to personal displays of affection.

The High Slicer of the Coleslaw Front issues a statement that Pilgrim Confused Stone’s construction of a bobble head army is a declaration of war. Pilgrim Loud-mouth Little-Gift issues a statement that says “Bring it on!” just as a ship from the talking Sky Cabbages lands at the park.

Pilgrim Impulsive Haiku explains the custom on her world of glomping on strangers and apologizes to George.

Pilgrim Confused Stone becomes excited when he finally looks at the contract and finds a clause that is written in the Talking Cabbages native language that says “Si n’importe qui se cache dans la salle de bains exécutive pendant plus de 24 heures, alors l’ennui peut être un pied, et le contrat peut être renégocié.”

“It’s the Porcelain Throne Clause, you poop!” bellows Loud-mouth Little-gift, announcing the voiding of the contract.

“It’s the executive bathroom, not the Porcelain Throne…” says George, sparking Impulsive Haiku to burst in laughter. Hazel explains to George that the name isn’t important- the Cabbages laugh nervously, their threat to sue having been instantly nullified.

Pleased with the way things are going, Confused Stone decides to relax a bit and ride his favorite ride the Ekke Ekke Ekke Ekke P’tang Zoo Boing roller coaster. Confused Stone accidentally gets into a modified cart, and the ride begins with him still not strapped in!

Running to the Ekke Ekke Ekke Ekke P’tang Zoo Boing roller coaster to Stop Confused Stone, Loud-mouth Little-gift trips and falls into the talking Sky Cabbages, which causes all the Sky Cabbages to fall down, and start to roll down the hill in which they were standing on. Just for fun, Impulsive Haiku pushes Hazel Harrington down the hill, causing her to roll down the hill just behind the cabbages. Impulsive Haiku shouts, “Everybody! Try the new ride!” and rolls down after Hazel and the cabbages.

Realizing a bit too late that the he was not buckled in correctly, Confused Stones holds on for dear life especially through the Ekke Ekke Ekke Ekke P’tang loops, but finshes the ride unharmed and thrilled at how fun the ride was.
Confused Stone then proceeds to be sick all over George, who is not amused.

Loud-mouth Little-gift, the artist that he is, begins to hand out caricature drawings to all those who arrive at the end of the impromptu hill ride.

While Impulsive Haiku is composing a poem about the new ride, she finds herself face to face with the High Slicer of The Coleslaw Front himself! Oh no, she was impulsive while composing the haiku, “It’s the High Slicer. who would be much more healthy. without the mayo!”

After becoming sick, Confused Stone decides to offer to “hose” down George in order to clean him up. Hazel Harrington- unable to keep a straight face any longer- bursts out laughing at her boss.

“I’ll just leave this pen and easel here so you can draw your own caricature!” shouts Loud-mouth Little-gift just before he flies away, almost surrounded by the Coleslaw Front. Impulsive Haiku squirts the High Slicer with a convenient bottle of mayo and flies away- as he shakes his eggy fist at her. Confused Stone proceeds into hooking up a hose to the fire hydrant, which shots water everywhere, and causing Confused Stone to fly into the air due to the pressure of the hose, and sadden by the mistakes, he decides to leave before causing any more confusion.